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Do as I say: MPAA violates software license

By Mauricio Freitas, in , posted: 18-Feb-2007 11:12

Found this through Digg (go on, if you have a Digg account, digg it too):


The author of ForestBlog, a blogging tool, has discovered that the MPAA was using his code in violation of his license. He gives the code away for free, but requires that users link back to his site and keep his name on the software. The MPAA deleted all credits and copyright notices from his work, and used it without permission. They ripped him off:


Way back in October last year whilst going through the website referals list for another of my sites I stumbled across this link. That's right, my blogging software is being used by the MPAA (Motion picture Association of America); probably one of the most hated organisations known to the internet. Cool, I thought, until I had a look around and saw that all of the back links to my main site had been removed with nary a mention in the source code!
Now, as Patrick Robin (the software author) notes, this probably wasn't the outcome of a high-level board meeting wherein the executive committee decided to rip him off. It was more likely the work of a lazy Web person at the MPAA who was cutting corners at work.


But the MPAA believes that employers should be held responsible for employees' copyright infringements. They want you to know that if you download movies at work, your employer will also be named in the suit. Infringe as we say, not as we do.



Read the complete entry on Boing Boing.

Incredible, isn't it. The all powerfull MPAA, which protect the movie industry "rights".

That's why I think our lawmakers shouldn't be influenced by foreigner lobby groups on these matters. They never seem to have the citizens' interests at heart. I agree on fair copyright laws, but some of the draconian attitudes and hostile acts against consumers, reported on everyday media just don't seem increase the content producer's share in the cake, and doesn't seem to protect the legitimate consumer who purchase over priced CDs and DVDs due to distribution costs.

Isn't it time for the recording and movie industries to find another way to distribute their products? What about a fair use license, with no crippling DRM, at good prices? I am probably one of the few people I know who actually buy DVDs to keep and play again and again at home. I wouldn't mind buying digital media over the internet for playback on my digital system - if the price was right and fair use licenses applied.








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Mauricio Freitas
Wellington
New Zealand


I live in New Zealand and my interests include mobile devices, good books, movies and food of course! 

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