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It's here: Halo 2 for Windows Vista

By Mauricio Freitas, in , posted: 1-Jun-2007 13:29

What a surprise: just received a copy of Halo 2 for Windows. I saw it a couple of weeks ago but it is now out!

The game will run on Windows Vista and includes single player, multiplayer, map editor, dedicated server hosting (I will try this!) and one month free Live Gold membership.




Now to get work out of the way and start the game.



Microsoft surface: stop and go see the video demos

By Mauricio Freitas, in , posted: 30-May-2007 18:22

A few years ago I was in Redmond, attending a Microsoft conference for web site owners and had the opportunity to see the Microsoft Digital Home. This was around 2004 and we all signed NDAs before steping inside.

One of the things we saw in a demo was this amazing table top in the kitchen where you could drop groceries and have recipes displayed automatically - using the "material" on hand. you could interact with the table top touching or simply placing objects on it.


Today Microsoft has announced Microsoft Surface. It is an evolution of that table top I saw a few years back, with much more functionality.

The idea is to have every day objects that we can interact with, and interact with each other. At a high level, Surface uses cameras to sense objects, hand gestures and touch. This user input is then processed and the result is displayed on the surface using rear projection.


Surface computing, which Microsoft has been working on for a number of years, features four key attributes:

• Direct interaction. Users can actually “grab” digital information with their hands, interacting with content by touch and gesture, without the use of a mouse or keyboard.
 
• Multi-touch. Surface computing recognizes many points of contact simultaneously, not just from one finger like a typical touch-screen, but up to dozens of items at once.
 
• Multi-user. The horizontal form factor makes it easy for several people to gather around surface computers together, providing a collaborative, face-to-face computing experience.
 
• Object recognition. Users can place physical objects on the surface to trigger different types of digital responses, including the transfer of digital content. 
 


Whatever you are doing now, make some time to watch the videos on the Microsoft Surface website. There's a video review on On10 as well.





Hackathon day coming to Wellington: SuperHappyDevHouse

By Mauricio Freitas, in , posted: 30-May-2007 18:01

Developers, prepare your bean bag, laptops and join the fun!

Today I met a few people who are working to bring the SuperHappyDevHouse series of events to Wellington:


SuperHappyDevHouse has become the Bay Area's premier monthly hackathon event that combines serious and not-so-serious productivity with a fun and exciting party atmosphere. Come to the DevHouse to have fun and get things done!

We're about rapid development, ad-hoc collaboration, and cross pollination. Whether you're a l33t hax0r, hardcore coder, or passionate designer, if you enjoy software and technology development, SuperHappyDevHouse was made for you.

DevHouse is not a marketing event. It's a non-exclusive event intended for passionate and creative technical people that want to have some fun, learn new things, and meet new people. In this way, we're trying to resurrect the spirit of the Homebrew Computer Club. We also draw inspiration from the demoscene as one of the only intentional getting-things-done computer events in the world.


Sounds fun? It sure does. If all goes well, the first meeting in Wellington will happen early July 2007, and other events will follow. We are currently seeking to arrange corporate sponsorship, venue, etc.

If you or your company wants to sponsor (venue, drinks, Internet access) please contact me and I will put you in touch with the folks organising the whole thing.

A SuperHappyDevHouse NZ wiki will be up soon. The first meeting will be an invitation only event, so we can gauge interest and arrange some of the infrastructure.



Google AdSense case study: Geekzone

By Mauricio Freitas, in , posted: 30-May-2007 17:52

Back in February and March 2007 I was in the Google AdSense Roadshow panel, participating in events around New Zealand and Australia (Auckland, Brisbane, Sydney, Melbourne). Geekzone was the New Zealand presence between the panelists - and now we are also a case study on Google AdSense:


Very cool, thanks guys!




Linux car crashes in Indianapolis

By Mauricio Freitas, in , posted: 30-May-2007 08:23

How ironic... CNET is reporting that the so-called Linux Car crashed during its debut in Indianapolis:


When the pale blue "Linux car," also known as car #77 from Chastain Motorsports, was the first car to crash in the 91st Indianapolis 500 on Sunday, we can imagine hordes of geeks wishing it had been a "Vista car" instead. Imagine the "blue screen of death" jokes that could have resulted!

The Linux car, as you probably know already, was the result of a campaign called Tux 500, jump-started by two enthusiasts named Bob Moore and Ken Starks. They solicited donations from fellow Linux fans in a "community powered Linux marketing program" to make the open-source operating system a household name by putting its logo on a race car. Unfortunately, it's likely going to be remembered as "the car that placed last."



I really wish the team a better result next time.



Disc Stakka software and drivers for Microsoft Windows Vista are out

By Mauricio Freitas, in , posted: 27-May-2007 09:27

More and more drivers for Microsoft Windows Vista are coming out. If you have an imation Disc Stakka you can now download the official driver and application from Opdicom.


I need to purchase a second unit, since my first one is already up to the 100 CDs/DVDs limit.





Unpack your vodem (take II)

By Mauricio Freitas, in , posted: 26-May-2007 11:31

Vodafone has released a vodem update that allows the device (a Vodafone-branded Huawei 220) to work with Microsoft Windows Vista.

The problem is that this update only runs on Windows XP, so if you are like myself and don't have a Windows XP machine anymore your option is to take the vodem to a Vodafone store and ask them to do the update there.


Lucky someone at Huawei leaked a vodem driver update that runs on Windows Vista. I have just finished installing it now, and it's in much better shape than before - the official Vodafone update didn't do much, but the update through Windows Vista worked really well...



Sony special screws for you

By Mauricio Freitas, in , posted: 26-May-2007 09:11

As consumers we are always interested to know how some companies get to establish prices for their services or parts. I mean, if you check the price charged for a automobile part when you take your car in for a service it makes you wonder how much cars would cost if those prices were applied.

Enters the Sony Special Screw (if they take link is down, you can see the screenshot below):


Yes, this is $38.40 for a single screw. Note this is the distribution price. And I am glad the store is certified "hacker safe". Can you imagine how much the screw would cost if hackers had their way with it?

Add the services provider margin on this, and you end up with a EUR 61.31 (US$ 82.50) Sony Special Screw:


That's right: US$82.50 for a single screw used in a Sony 13cm speaker. How is this for making huge money and literally screwing the customer?

You can find the original image and discussion here. Found this through Consumerist.






Mainframes back then and now

By Mauricio Freitas, in , posted: 25-May-2007 14:15

One of the comments on the story about Unisys launching a new series of Intel-based mainframes came from Juha, who asked "Intel-based?".

Yes, microprocessor based mainframes. This is what is all about now. The old CMOS-based technology has been out of production for years, if you don't know. Unisys has been using Intel-based mainframes, or "enterprise servers" for a generation. 

Those mainframes, are still alive and kicking, with both Unisys and IBM competing in the market for large processing - and many companies are still running on them.

As an example, Telecom New Zealand's current voice mail platform runs on a resilient, four-mainframe, fully failover capable system from Unisys (I am aware this system is being replaced in 2007 though).

To have an idea of numbers, I've contacted Telecom New Zealand and asked how many voice mail calls are processed by this platform (for other intelligent features run on this installation) and I was told that about 5.5 million calls to Telecom mobiles go through to the voice mail daily. This is for mobile phones only, not counting the fixed line voice mail which is processed in the same platform.

So what a modern mainframe looks like? Just check the picture of this new Unisys Dorado 400 Clearpath series:


Pretty much like any other rack, right? Now compare it with an old Burroughs B5900 about 30 years old), including (from left to right) line printer, tape unit, CPU, consoles, removable disc units:









Google Calendar moves to mobile

By Mauricio Freitas, in , posted: 25-May-2007 10:51

Companies are realising that more mobile phones are in use today than computers. And we see many mobile handsets will full Internet access capabilities being underutilised. How many people you know are aware that it is possible to install a new application on their Symbian or Windows Mobile smartphone? Believe me, some people never knew it was possible.

The natural step is for companies to provide mobile services - and this is what Google is doing with its Google Calendar. If you are using Google Calendar simply point your mobile browser to www.google.com/calendar (or www.google.com/calendar/m if your device doesn't redirect automatically) and it will show something like this now:


Google has already "mobilised" its web-based e-mail service and now it's the time for the calendar to follow.

One thing though: developers need to be very creative because natural device restrictions (screen size, keypad) and software restrictions (limited javascript and plugin support) require lots of different solutions.





freitasm's profile

Mauricio Freitas
Wellington
New Zealand


I live in New Zealand and my interests include mobile devices, good books, movies and food of course! 

I work for Intergen and I'm also the Geekzone admin. On Geekzone we publish news, reviews and articles on technology topics. The site also has some busy forums.

Subscribe now to my blog RSS feed or the Geekzone RSS feed.

If you want to contact me, please use this page or email me freitasm@geekzone.co.nz. Note this email is not for technical support. I don't give technical support. You can use our Geekzone Forums for community discussions on technical issues.

Here's is my full disclosure post.

If you'd like to help me keep Geekzone going, please use this Geekzone Amazon affiliate link when placing any orders on Amazon.



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