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The Pocket PC is dead... The Apple touch wins

By Mauricio Freitas, in , posted: 6-Sep-2007 10:29

Seriously, the announcement of the Apple touch shows what a Pocket PC should've been branched to a couple of years ago - despite some efforts from HP with their sub standard "media companion" series.

Just to check the specs, the Apple touch is like an Apple iPhone, but without the cellular voice and data part. It comes with Wi-Fi for Internet access, including the Safari browser and iTunes Music Store. And it comes with 8 GB and 16 GB storage. We can't find this on Pocket PCs.

With its wireless you can sample and purchase music on-line, and next time you plug it to your PC the songs are downloaded. Easy as...

And there's the user interface, based on the multi-touch technology, the same used on the iPhone.

The Nokia N770 would be the closest competitor to the iPod touch, if it wasn't for its non-consumer appeal. It's a geek device, but with very nifty features - I really liked the one I had for a week for review. But users in general don't want to go messing around with a complicated Linux user interface.

Meanwhile, what were Microsoft's attempts to get to the mainstream consumer market?

Windows Mobile, the operating system behind Microsoft's Pocket PCs and Smartphones evolved into a hybrid system used on Portable Media Centers. Those are dead now. They were large, heavy with short battery life. Oh, there was the iRiver Clix, which was really small, but I didn't even see one in real life.

Then came the Zune, with an user inteface kind of similar to the Portable Media Center. Usable, but limited. And the fact that with the Zune you can only use the Wi-Fi for limited music sharing - no Internet browsing, no on-line purchases, nothing else.

Then we have the multiple Microsoft approaches to on-line music. We had the MSN Music, now closed. We had the Plays for sure initiative, now dead. We had the Urge, no longer supported by MTV which has just moved to Real Networks Rhapsody services.

Microsoft tried three or four different "platforms" and they all were limited - either user interface, regional availability of hardware, or very restricted and limited availability of content.

When are they going to learn?







Other related posts:
Windows Phone and Android apps screen comparison
Windows Phone 8 Portico update: at last here in New Zealand
Windows Phone updates, again






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freitasm's profile

Mauricio Freitas
Wellington
New Zealand


I live in New Zealand and my interests include mobile devices, good books, movies and food of course! 

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